Your choice of Wi-Fi router/modem (#router)

ADSL2 versus VDSL2

FTTN and FTTB connections require VDSL2 Wi-Fi routers/modems when connecting to a new plan. If you’re ready to make the switch, keep in mind that older routers/modems used to connect to ADSL/ADSL2 broadband technologies may not be compatible. Talk to your service provider to ensure the Wi-Fi router/modem they supply is suited to your needs.

Not all Wi-Fi routers/modems are the same. 5 Ghz units with either the 802.11n (released in 2009) or the 802.11ac (released in 2013) standards are needed to support a plan based on the higher 50Mbps and 100Mbps wholesale speed tiers*. All other Wi-Fi routers/modems made before 2009 may struggle to reach higher speeds.

If your premises is connected via FTTP, HFC, Fixed Wireless or Sky Muster™ satellite, it’s recommended your Wi-Fi router/modem is capable of supporting a Gigabit Wide Area Network (WAN – telecommunication/computer network that extends over a large geographical distance).

* We’re designing the nbn™ network to provide these speeds to our wholesale customers, telephone and internet service providers. End user experience, including the speeds actually achieved over the nbn™ network, depends on the technology over which services are delivered to your premises and some factors outside our control like your equipment quality, software, broadband plans, signal reception and how the end user’s service provider designs its network.

Objects that interfere with your Wi-Fi signal (#interference)

Objects that interfere with your Wi-Fi signal

Certain objects in your home like microwave ovens, televisions, hot water systems, ovens and fish tanks will interfere with the Wi-Fi signal strength. Thick walls or other metallic surfaces like mirrors or fridge doors will also impact the quality of your signal.

Try and position your Wi-Fi router/modem in the centre of the home, considering the layout of your house and where the internet enabled devices are located. Where possible, you should avoid thick walls and look to have line-of-sight with your Wi-Fi router/modem.

The effect of different Wi-Fi signals (#wifisignals)

The effect of different Wi-Fi signals

The Wi-Fi signal inside some devices may not provide sufficient reception if you are too far away from the Wi-Fi router/modem – here we talk about the types of Wi-Fi frequencies and how they can affect your reception.

2.4 GHz

The most common Wi-Fi frequency of 2.4 GHz offers the greatest range and is capable of reaching through a variety of wall thicknesses. However this range, coupled with the ability to go through walls also limits its speed potential.

Many Wi-Fi routers/modems and Wi-Fi enabled devices in your home will operate on the 2.4 GHz spectrum because of the "all purpose" durability of the 2.4 GHz range.

The newer 5 GHz Wi-Fi frequency is currently not as common as the 2.4 GHz frequency – it will become more common as new devices enter the market. While 5 GHz generally provides higher data rates compared with 2.4 GHz, its one potential weakness is that 5 GHz signals do not generally travel as far as 2.4 GHz signals. For optimum performance, you need to ensure that your devices are located relatively close to your Wi-Fi router/modem, without too many interfering objects between the device and the unit itself.

If you’re unsure which frequency will work best for you, speak to your phone and internet provider about your set-up and specific needs.

You may want to consider adjusting the channel your Wi-Fi router/modem runs on. If too many people are using the same channel at the same time it can slow down your internet experience. Check your Wi-Fi router/modem operating instructions to see whether this is possible.

Thick/complex walls (#walls)

Thick/complex walls

Thick walls will likely impact the quality of your signal. Not all walls are the same. Walls containing water pipes, air-conditioning ducts and insulation will interfere with the Wi-Fi signal strength more than simple room partitions like Gyprock. You’ll also find that brick, stone, ceramic, concrete, metal, and mirrors will greatly reduce your signal strength.

Try and position the Wi-Fi router/modem in the centre of the home, considering the layout of your house and where the internet enabled devices are located. Where possible, you should look to have line-of-sight with your Wi-Fi router/modem, or have it pass through glass rather than thick walls.

A Wi-Fi repeater can help to amplify your signal and extend your coverage. If you’re still having issues, consider using a fixed connection like an Ethernet cable.

Multiple devices connected at the same time (#multipledevices)

Multiple devices connected at the same time

The amount of connected devices running through your Wi-Fi router/modem at the same time can have an impact on the maximum speeds that can be experienced. Basic Wi-Fi routers/modems start to experience connectivity issues with more than 8 Wi-Fi connected devices.

You will need to speak to your phone and internet provider or an IT professional about whether your Wi-Fi router/modem suits your specific needs.

High Definition TV (#tv)

High Definition TV

Internet enabled High Definition (HD) TVs (often referred to as 4K TVs) require a fast speed and consistent signal strength when viewing 4K content. As we head into the future and 4K content becomes more common, an Ethernet cable connection or a 5 Ghz Wi-Fi signal (with line-of-sight to the TV) is highly recommended for optimum performance.

In-home wiring (#wiring)

In-home wiring

The quality of the wiring inside your home can contribute to the speeds you will experience.

If your speeds are limited, it could be a good idea to have the quality of the wiring inside your home/building walls checked. For example: if you live in an older building and there's evidence of many different unused phone/TV sockets and/or evidence of older phone installations it may be worth having your home network assessed by a registered cabler – they can help to isolate and clean up your in-home network.

Older devices (#olderdevices)

Older devices

Software compatibility

Some older devices in your home may struggle in terms of speed and capacity when you switch to your new plan. Often the solution is to simply update your device to the latest software version of the manufacturer’s operating system. Check with your device manufacturer's support community for additional help.

Just like your Wi-Fi router/modem, the Wi-Fi receiver in your device (such as computers, laptops, tablets and smart phones) needs to be compatible with the 802.11n or 802.11ac Wi-Fi standards in order to reach the superfast speeds available over a retail plan based on the 50Mbps and 100Mbps wholesale speeds tiers*. Wi-Fi enabled devices made before 2009 will be incapable of achieving higher speeds.


* We’re designing the nbn™ network to provide these speeds to our wholesale customers, telephone and internet service providers. End user experience, including the speeds actually achieved over the nbn™ network, depends on the technology over which services are delivered to your premises and some factors outside our control like your equipment quality, software, broadband plans, signal reception and how the end user’s service provider designs its network.

Mobile content

How to optimise your experience at home

Make the most of your internet connection with these tips for your in-home set-up.

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1. Your choice of Wi-Fi router/modem

Choosing the right Wi-Fi router/modem can help improve your online experience.

FTTN and FTTB connections require VDSL2 Wi-Fi routers/modems.
Choose a Wi-Fi router/modem based on your specific needs.
Plug directly into your Wi-Fi router/modem for the best experience.
Older Wi-Fi routers/modems used on ADSL may not work.
Wi-Fi routers/modems made before 2009 may not support plans based on higher wholesale speed tiers*.
Keep in mind not all Wi-Fi routers/modems are the same.

The positioning of your Wi-Fi router/modem can change your experience.

Try and position the Wi-Fi router/modem in the centre of the home.
Always try to have line-of-sight with your Wi-Fi router/modem.
Avoid placing your Wi-Fi router/modem near thick walls.
Fish tanks and TVs will interfere with your Wi-Fi signal.

Picking the right Wi-Fi frequency for optimal performance.

5 GHz signals generally provide higher data rates than 2.4 GHz.
2.4 GHz offers the greatest range through a variety of wall thicknesses.
The Wi-Fi signal inside some devices may not provide sufficient reception.
5 GHz signals do not generally travel as far as 2.4 GHz.

Avoiding thick walls can help you to get the most out of your signal.

Try and position your Wi-Fi router/modem in the centre of the home.
Having line-of-sight with your Wi-Fi router/modem will help.
A Wi-Fi repeater can help to amplify your signal.
Thick walls can have an impact on your signal.
Avoid brick, stone, ceramic, concrete, metal and mirrors.

Busy homes with many devices need better Wi-Fi.

Choose a Wi-Fi router/modem that suits your needs.
Speak to your internet provider or IT professional.
Speeds can be affected with multiple devices online.
Basic Wi-Fi routers/modems experience issues with 8 devices online.

Prepare yourself for the future of HD TV.

HD TVs need fast internet and a consistent signal strength.
An Ethernet cable or a 5 Ghz Wi-Fi signal is recommended.

Update your in-home wiring to help improve your internet experience.

If speed is limited, get your wiring checked.
Upgrade your wiring through a registered cabler today.
Old wiring can lead to slower speeds.
Old buildings - check for evidence of older phone installations.

Ensuring your equipment is up-to-date can help improve your experience.

Updating your device’s software can help.
Check with the manufacturer for compatibility information.
All computers/tablets/smart phones have a Wi-Fi receiver.
Once compatible, devices can generally reach superfast speeds.
Older devices may struggle to cope with the speeds when you switch.
Receivers need to be compatible with 802.11n or 802.11ac.

Check your address

To find out if the nbn™ access network is available at your home or business

Check your address

To find out if the nbn™ access network is available at your home or business